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Title The dynamic littoral fringe Spatial and temporal patterns in community structureand productivity in North American coastal ecosystems
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Abstract

This presentation will illustrate case studies of changes in littoral ecosystems on the Northern Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern Atlantic coasts, as captured with satellite and airborne imagery analysis. On the Georgia coast, 35 years of Landsat imagery revealed large scale (3 fold) inter-annual variation and a cumulative net loss of 16.5% in the aboveground biomass of the keystone salt marsh species, Spartina alterniflora. Spatial differences and temporal changes in 620 km2 (about 680,000 pixels of Spartina habitat) were linked to climate variables, river hydrology, and sea level dynamics. In the same area, riparian brackish and freshwater wetlands are sensitive indicators of changes in salinity patterns. On the Texas coast, Black Mangrove vegetation is replacing salt marsh communities, as shown in analysis of high resolution WorldView satellite imagery. This "tropicalization" is well underway, but also reveals instabilities due to occasional winter incursions of arctic air. Finally, at multiple sites, we've used airborne hyperspectral and HICO Space Station imagery to document patterns of phytoplankton chlorophyll (including HABs) and CDOM in estuarine, inshore, and shelf waters.

Contributors John F. Schalles, J.P. O'Donnell, Christine M. Hladik, Sonya Ponzi, Fang Cao and William Miller
Citation

Schalles, J.F., O'Donnell, J., Hladik, C.M., Ponzi, S., Cao, F. and Miller, W. 2018. Poster: The dynamic littoral fringe - Spatial and temporal patterns in community structureand productivity in North American coastal ecosystems. Poster Session - Tuesday. GLOBOLakes and GEO Aquawatch Joint Workshop, Wednesday, August 29, 2018, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, UK.

Key Words algal chlorophyll, CDOM, coastal waters, community structure, remote sensing, Student Publication, wetlands
File Date 2018
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NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grants OCE-9982133, OCE-0620959, OCE-1237140 and OCE-1832178. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.