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Presentations NSF Site Review 2009 Georgia Coastal Research Council Overview
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Janice Flory, 2009)
PDF file
    Natural and Human Impacts on Back-barrier Islands of Georgia
Abstract - Both natural processes (e.g., erosion, vegetative succession, changes in sea level) and human processes (e.g., prehistoric shell deposition, modern clearing) have impacted the structure of back-barrier islands on the coast of Georgia. Both types of processes have occurred continually throughout the past and present. Present-day-back-barrier islands cannot be understood without a thorough knowledge of their landscape history. Thus for a more complete understanding of present-day estuarine ecosystem processes, past and present human activity must be taken into consideration.
(contributed by John Turck, 2009)
PDF file
    Temporal and Spatial Trends in Nitrogen and Phosphorus Inputs to The Watershed of the Altamaha River
Abstract - The watershed of the Altamaha River, Georgia, is one of the largest in the southeastern U.S., draining 36,718 km2 (including parts of metro Atlanta). We calculated both nitrogen (fertilizer, net food and feed import, atmospheric deposition, and biological N fixation in agricultural and forest lands) and phosphorus (fertilizer and net food and feed import) inputs to the watershed for 6 time points between 1954 and 2002. Total N inputs rose from 1,943 kg N km-2 yr-1 in 1954 to a peak of 3,584 kg N km-2 yr-1 in 1982 and then declined again to 2,566 kg N km-2 yr-1 by 2002. Phosphorus inputs rose from 408 kg P km-2 yr-1 in 1954 to 531 kg P km-2 yr-1 in 1974 before also declining again, to 410 kg P km-2 yr-1 in 2002. These changes were primarily driven by agricultural inputs and were dominated by changes in fertilizer use. Fertilizer tended to be the most important input of both N and P to the watershed, although net food and feed import increased in importance over time and was the dominant source of N input by 2002. When considered on an individual basis, fertilizer input tended to be highest in the middle portions of the watershed (Little and Lower Ocmulgee and Lower Oconee sub-basins) whereas net food and feed imports were highest in the upper reaches (Upper Oconee and Upper Ocmulgee sub-basins). Although the overall trend in recent years has been towards decreases in both N and P inputs, these trends may be offset due to continuing increases in animal and human populations.
(contributed by Sylvia Schaefer, 2009)
MS PowerPoint
    Understanding Plant Distributions Surrounding Marsh Hammocks Within the Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER
Abstract - Accurate habitat mapping in salt marshes is important for both management and conservation goals, as it provides information essential for identifying sensitive areas and documenting changes over time as the result of sea level rise or human perturbations. The goal of this study is to characterize patterns of marsh plant distribution in the salt marshes surrounding back barrier islands (hammocks) within the Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER. In the summer of 2007 the GCE LTER surveyed over 50 hammocks of different origin and size. Sub-meter accuracy GPS units were used to map the hammock upland border and the extent of the upper marsh (from the hammock border to the upper edge of Spartina alterniflora, i.e. the marsh “halo”), and plants within the halo were characterized. Analysis of these data showed that marsh plant community composition directly adjacent to the upland border is affected by both the size and origin of the hammock. Additionally, there are significant differences in both the mean halo width and the dominant plant species in relation to hammock size and origin. I am currently using Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data in combination with hyperspectral aerial imagery to map plant species to elucidate how elevation, in addition to proximity to uplands, determines marsh plant distributions.
(contributed by Christine Hladik, 2009)
MS PowerPoint
    GCE Midterm review, Education
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Steve Pennings, 2009)
MS PowerPoint
    Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER - Information Management Overview
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Wade Sheldon, 2009)
MS PowerPoint
  Oral Presentations Tools for Sensor Data Quality Control
Abstract - Regardless of Q/A procedures, data quality issues are guaranteed with environmental sensor data. Without good Q/C data users can draw invalid conclusions (untrustworthy data). Therefore Q/C analysis is a critical part of any monitoring program.
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2017)
PDF file
    EML Packages from the GCE Data Toolbox
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2017)
PDF file
    Putting the Archives to Work: Workflow and Metadata-driven Analysis in LTER Science
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2014)
PDF file
    Example Workflows for Sensor Data Processing and QA/QC
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2014)
PDF file
    The GCE Data Toolbox
Abstract - (none)
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2014)
PDF file
    Listening to and learning from local ecological knowledge: A social science pilot study in McIntosh County, GA
Abstract - In this presentation I will share findings from a series of 19 interviews with long -term residents of McIntosh County Georgia. The interviews were designed to gather basic information about local perceptions of land -use and environmental change in this coastal county over the last 50 years. They were also conducted in order to gather information about resident’s primary environmental concerns and explore local ecological knowledge held by long-term residents. I will share the way participants voiced concerns about the loss of wetlands, changes in freshwater flow and salinity, and changes in populations of marine organ isms. Some commonly shared ideas raise additional questions about perceptions of environmental health. For example, the idea that trawling in areas like Sapelo Sound may have been beneficial and that the absence of this activity may have lead to a decline in water quality and the health of shellfish and finfish populations.
(contributed by Danyel Addes, 2014)
PDF file
    Using MATLAB to Analyze LTER Data in PASTA and ClimDB
Abstract - Use of the GCE Data Toolbox to retrieve and analyze LTER data uploaded to the PASTA framework of the Network Information System and ClimDB climate database was described and demonstrated.
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2012)
PDF file
    Cranes, Planes, and Planktonic Meals: Habitat Characterizations in Gulf and East Coast NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserves
Abstract - The wise management of NOAA's Estuarine Research Reserves and other coastal sites requires accurate and timely information on the spatial extent, ecosystem health, and geospatial relationships of diverse habitats. Tools to delineate habitats using high resolution imagery, masking techniques, and the unique spectral characteristics of micro and macro vegetation to map wetlands, water, mudflats, and other habitats can provide a solution.
(contributed by John F. Schalles, 2012)
PDF file
    From Scientist and Sensor to Synthesis: Metabase Metadata Management System
Abstract - The Metabase is a generalized relational database management system for managing LTER metadata, including personnel lists, site geography (study area polygons, point locations), instrumentation, research projects and data sets (studies, methods, entities, attributes, files). The database is also linked to bibliographic and taxonomic databases, supporting automatic cross-links between personnel, research, publications and data. The database also supports reciprocal queries between resources, for example data sets by investigator, and data sets referenced in publications. This database allows centralized management of all project information, and supports automated metadata generation for data sets and cross-links between related resources on the web.
(contributed by Wade M. Sheldon, 2012)
PDF file
57 Records
LTER
NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grants OCE-9982133, OCE-0620959 and OCE-1237140. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.